Tarkett Planning Initial Public Offering

Paris, France, Oct. 7, 2013 — Flooring firm Tarkett is planning an initial public stock offering, Reuters reported. The firm is 50% owned by U.S. private-equity firm KKR and the Deconinck family. KKR will reportedly float part of its stake and the Deconincks will buy more shares to keep their ownership stake above 50%, Reuters reported. A listing on the Paris stock exchange could value Tarkett at as much as 2.5 billion euros ($3.41 billion), according to the Financial...

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Small City’s Leading Housing Rebound

Washington, DC, Oct. 8, 2015 — Housing markets in 52 out of the approximately 350 metro areas nationwide have now returned to or exceeded their pre-recessionary levels of activity, according to the National Association of Home Builders/First American Leading Markets Index. The new index, which replaces the former Improving Markets Index, recorded an initial nationwide score of .85. That number indicates that, based on current permits, prices and employment data, the nationwide housing market is running at 85% of normal activity. Baton Rouge tops the list of major metros on the LMI, with a score of 1.41 – or 41% better than its last normal market level. Other major metros at the top of the list include Honolulu, Oklahoma City, Austin and Houston, Texas, as well as Harrisburg, Pa. – all of whose LMI scores indicate that their housing markets now exceed previous norms. Looking at smaller metros, both Odessa and Midland, Texas, boast LMI scores of 2.0 or better, meaning that their housing markets are now at double their strength prior to the recession. Also at the top of the list of smaller metros are Casper, Wyo.; Bismarck, N.D.; and Florence, Ala., respectively. “This index helps illustrate how far the U.S. housing recovery has come, and also how much further it has to go as we continue to face some significant headwinds in terms of credit availability, rising costs for lots and labor, and uncertainties regarding Washington policymaking,” said NAHB Chairman Rick Judson. The LMI shifts the focus from identifying markets that have recently begun to recover, which was the aim of a previous gauge known as the Improving Markets Index, to identifying those areas that are now approaching and exceeding their previous normal levels of activity. More than 350 metro areas are scored by taking their average permit, price and employment numbers for the past 12 months and dividing each by their annual average over the last period of normal growth. For single-family permits and home prices, 2000-2003 is used as the last normal period, and for employment, 2007 is the base comparison. “Smaller metros are leading the way to a housing recovery, accounting for 43 of the top 50 markets on the current LMI,” observed NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe. “This is very much in keeping with the results of our previous index for improving markets, and is an indication of the extent to which local economic conditions dictate the strength of individual housing...

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Is Moisture a Problem?

Is Moisture a Problem?

Is Moisture a Problem? Anyone who’s been through the construction process has heard the words “moisture mitigation.” While it’s not new, concern over the issue has grown over the last 10 years. One reason is condensed construction timelines, which mean most projects are fast-tracked, leaving less time for concrete slabs to dry. This leaves slab moisture levels (relative humidity or RH levels) at unsuitable levels for flooring installations to perform. However, these levels must be met in order to maintain a manufacturer’s warranty. Another issue is the shift to more sustainable materials and building practices. Josh DiGloria, senior project manager, <a href=”http://www.suffolkconstruction.com/” target=”_blank”>Suffolk Construction</a> (Boston) says in an effort to go green, flooring manufacturers have replaced some of the toxic chemicals in their glues with more water-based ingredients. “The concrete mixtures originate from limestone and have calcium silicate components within the final slab product, and when you put the flooring adhesives on the concrete slab and then put rubber flooring directly on top, the water vapors will move thru the slab and interact with the glue,” he says. “So a lot of hospitals and health care projects that use rubber have seen failures in the rubber adhesion bonding to the floor, which create bubbling or floor section peeling up.” Finally, the composition of the concrete itself can be an issue. Jennifer Mango, interior designer, at<a href=”http://www.tka-architects.com/” target=”_blank”>TSOI/Kobus &amp; Associates</a> (Cambridge, Mass.), says concrete is specified in an array of mixes that are customized to the application, and when ingredients are added, that alters the concrete’s dry time as well as its physical characteristic, which impacts the adhesive’s ability to bond. The key to addressing these problems is planning. “Before you actually put the concrete slab into the project, you have to have a plan for how you’re going to solve the moisture mitigation,” DiGloria says, “and the cost of the plan has to be included in the budget.” Mango says some project choose to “wait it out” with a budgeted moisture mitigation contingency. Then when the flooring is ready for install, a moisture test is conducted to get a relative humidity (RH) reading on the slab. If the level is low enough, the installation can move forward. If not, a moisture mitigation system is required, which means premium costs and schedule delays. “The reality is that moisture mitigation is almost always required,” she adds. In the end, project partners needs to have a discussion early on to weigh scheduling, impacts, and cost options. “The only rule is you have to plan something,” DiGloria says. -source:  <a href=”http://www.healthcaredesignmagazine.com/article/moisture-mitigation-issue-you-can-t-afford-ignore”...

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What is VCT?

What is VCT?

What is VCT?   Vinyl tiles are composed of colored vinyl chips formed into solid sheets of varying thicknesses (1/8” is most common) by heat and pressure and cut into 12” squares. Tiles are applied to a smooth, leveled sub-floor using a specially formulated vinyl adhesive that remains tacky but does not completely dry. Tiles are typically waxed and buffed using special materials and equipment. Vinyl tile is favored over other kinds of flooring materials in high-traffic areas because of its low cost, durability, and ease of maintenance. Vinyl tiles have high resilience to abrasion and impact damage and can be repeatedly refinished with chemical strippers and mechanical buffing equipment. If properly installed, tiles can be easily removed and replaced when damaged. Tiles are available in a variety of colors from several major flooring manufacturers. Tiles can easily be cut and assembled into colorful and decorative...

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Multi-Purpose

Multi-Purpose

Multi-Purpose: People who live, play, learn and heal in balanced environments are happier and more productive. It’s all about achieving the right balance of function and aesthetics, even when that means incorporating many activities into one space. Today, multi-functionality rules. The locker room may be connected to the weight room, which is down the hall from the community room, which is also the cafeteria. Every element must serve a specific or several functions, as well as tie into the overall space design. Multi-purpose flooring contains a wide range products. They’re designed to work for all kinds of people performing all kinds of activities. There are an array of colors, patterns, textures and...

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